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Recipe Rating




33 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I made this recipe during the Christmas holidays and it’s mid March and people are still begging for it. This is the best peanut brittle recipe that I could think of is so buttery and rich I love it. Thank you so much for sharing.

  2. This is my second time making any type of candy and second time making brittle but with a different recipe. I was finally able to get to the hard crack stage. The first time I made brittle I don’t think I let it stay at 300 long enough so this recipe has some truth to the magic 305.

    Although pretty delicious, I still have a little back end stickiness to the brittle. Not as bad as my first time making brittle, but enough to mention. That’s not any fault to the recipe though… I’m sure I just need more practice with candy and my thermometer. This recipe is definitely worth a try!

    1. It sounds like it may have been cooked a tiny bit over 305 degrees F. If your candy thermometer showed 305 degrees, you might want to test it to make sure it’s accurate. (Bring a pot of water to a full rolling boil then use your candy thermometer to check the temperature. It should be 212 degrees F. If it’s not, you would need to adjust the temperature of any other foods you cook accordingly or get a new candy thermometer.) I hope this helps!

    1. Yes! You can use parchment paper. I would probably still use a little butter on the parchment to make sure it doesn’t stick but that’s just me!

    2. @Jennifer,
      The first time I made this is turned out perfect but the second time I followed directions exactly the same and it sticks to your teeth when eating. Any suggestion?

      1. I would double-check your candy thermometer and make sure it is working properly. When placed into boiling water for 30 seconds, the thermometer should read 212 degrees F.

  3. Hi, great recipe and thanks for sharing. My peanut brittle comes out shining and has a little greasy/filmy feeling when I handle them. I sometimes use wax paper to absorb the excess butter. Am I doing something wrong or it us normal to have that layer of shine and buttery feeling?

    Thank you

    1. I think it’s normal for the peanut butter to be a little shiny and buttery. You could get less of the buttery feeling if you didn’t coat the pan with butter, but I always do it for the non-stick factor and the buttery flavor.

    1. I get the raw Spanish peanuts in the local grocery store either in the baking aisle or sometimes in the produce section in little plastic containers. We also have a local nut store that I have used a few times. My Walmart does not carry the raw peanuts very often, if at all.

  4. I made this peanut brittle today and it came out pretty well except I had a heck of a time getting it out of the pan. Most of it broke into tiny pieces and some of it I had to just pour boiling water over to remove it. I slathered the pans with a lot of butter…what do you suggest?

    1. I usually pry up a corner or edge with a butter knife or at lot of times just my fingernail. A big sheet of brittle will pull up then I just snap off pieces as big as I want. Also sometimes helps to twist the pan a bit if it’s flexible at all. That should at least loosen it up. I use a stainless steel pan that does not have any nonstick coating on it.

  5. This recipe was perfect…
    Every step was spot on and my peanut brittle came out to perfection thank you so much..

  6. Soooo, I have made different recipes for brittle and I must say, this one is a good recipe! I was skeptical towards the end because to me, the color wasn’t changing to a dark color like I’m used to. After it started getting hard, I thought about it and was thinking it had to be because of the butter mixed in. Like ya say, 305 is the magic number for it to be “brittle”!!
    I will definitely make this recipe again!!
    Thanks for sharing!

    1. I use a 4-quart heavy bottom stainless steel saucepan to make my peanut brittle. With this size pot, the sugar mixture does not even get close to boiling over. When I’m finished making the peanut brittle, I immediately put the pot in the sink and fill it with HOT HOT water and a little dish soap. I throw the utensils in the pot too. By the time I get ready to wash everything, the sugar mixture has pretty much melted off.

  7. Delicious! First time ever attempting peanut brittle and only my second time using a candy thermometer. This is easily the best peanut brittle we’ve ever had! We love our peanut brittle, so we’ve tried a lot! Won’t have to try anymore though! Thank you for this amazing fool proof recipe!

    1. I think the only answer is that the sugar mixture was not cooked to the proper temperature. 305 degrees F is well into the hard-crack stage so if the candy reached this temperature, it would be hard and not soft like taffy. Did you use a candy thermometer? If so, you might want to test it to make sure it’s accurate. (Bring a pot of water to a full rolling boil then use your candy thermometer to check the temperature. It should be 212 degrees F. If it’s not, you would need to adjust the temperature of any other foods you cook accordingly or get a new candy thermometer.) Hope this helps!